Ms. Cleo Has (Not) Left the Building

General Discussion about the game of Checkers.

Re: In Denial

Postby matthewkooshad on Sat Dec 10, 2005 5:00 am

This is whack. Becky, why are you acting that way? I am offended for you to use phrase such as "Take care and God Bless." and in same breath you request someone to offend you. I certainly hope that your age is not over 25 as you are acting nothing like a female should. I do not mean to flame you, but please do not use God's name in the same breath that you speak any sarcasm or criticism.
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Re: In Denial

Postby Alex_Moiseyev on Sat Dec 10, 2005 2:04 pm

Lindus Edwards wrote:I know many checker players and not one of them has even seen Ms Becky at a checker tournament!


Hi, Lindus ! Yes, I never had a pleasure to meet with Ms. Becky at checkers tournament, however I am deighted to say, that it was honored for me to meet my friend, Mr. Don DeWeber once in official checkers tournament. It was my first draughts event ever, back to summer 1996, when I visited club in New Castle, Pennsylvania, and joined with my long life friends - Tony Kozenski and Don DeWeber. In September, 1996 they invited me to play in OH State tournament, 1996, and I accepted their offer !

It was so unusual, interesting and so many fun - I will always remember.

Here are my games with Mr. DeWeber. I didn't record rounds and don't know - it was exactly my official tournament games #1/#2, or not.

G1. A. Moiseyev vs D. DeWeber
OH State ty, 1996, Massilon

11-15 22-17 9-13 17-14 10-17 21-14 6-9 (A) 25-21 9-18 23-14 8-11 29-25 4-8 24-19 15-24 28-19 11-16 27-23 8-11 (B) 25-22 16-20 19-16 12-19 23-16 2-6 16-12 6-10 30-25 10-17 21-14 11-15 25-21 7-11 14-10 5-9 22-17 13-22 26-17 9-13 17-14 15-18 14-9 18-22 9-6 22-25 6-2 25-30 2-7 11-15 7-11 15-18 11-7 18-22 7-11 22-25 11-15 25-29 15-11 29-25 11-7 25-22 7-11 22-18 11-7 13-17 and after several moves Red Wins

A. LOL ... After 10 years in draughts things look different.

B. After this nasty wasting move red position immediately becomes critical, if not a lost. 1-6 instead would be correct

C. Interesting situation. See diagram #1. It is obvious that 19-16 trade erase white winning chances, but the most important question here - could white win by 32-27 ? My intuition says - YES.

#1. A. Moiseyev vs D. DeWeber
Image
White to move (32-27*)

G2. D. DeWeber vs A. Moiseyev
OH State ty, 1996, Massilon

11-15 22-17 9-13 17-14 10-17 21-14 8-11 23-19 15-18 26-23 4-8 24-20 13-17 31-26 17-21 19-15 6-9 (A) 28-24 9-13 23-19 2-6 15-10 6-15 19-10 11-15 (B) 25-22 18-25 29-22 8-11 27-23 White Wins

A. I think Don missed a a pretty win at this point - 12-16!. See diagram #2.

B. Strange enough, but even at this point draw was still in hands - 12-16!

#2. D. DeWeber vs A. Moiseyev
Image
12-16! wins
I am playing checkers, not chess.
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Re: In Denial

Postby Lindus Edwards on Sat Dec 10, 2005 9:48 pm

Alex, it makes a refreshing change to see a post containing games :lol:
I will study these games carefully as I wish to improve in playing strength. This can only be achieved through study and playing tough games in tournaments.
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Re: In Denial

Postby Lindus Edwards on Sat Dec 10, 2005 10:00 pm

Just took a quick look at the first game and I also think 32-27 (at the point where 19-16 was played) might have won. Perhaps reds only hope then would be to exchange 7-10 but with such positions the usual endgame loss is looming.
That was, of course, just a fast appraisal
:lol:
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Study and playing tough games...............................

Postby Alan Millhone on Sat Dec 10, 2005 10:12 pm

Hello Mr. Edwards:

I agree with you 100% that study and entering tournaments are two of the best ways of improving ones game. At my board at home I like Mr. Fortman's " BASIC CHECKERS " and Wiswell and Shuffett's " AMERICA'S BEST CHECKERS". I have a nice Checker library but only have limited time to study. At the recent Las Vegas International Match Mr. Joe Schwartz never lost a game and won ten and was the highest scorer on the USA Team. He credited all his success to the study of " BASIC CHECKERS ". I attend most USA Tournaments and enjoy meeting and playing all the top players there. Mr. Alex told me several years ago that if I did not have ample time to study (which I don't) that the next best thing was to play hard games at tournaments. I always play in the Masters ( they let me) and seek out the best players when ever possible to play.

Mr. Alex ........... I may not respond too much to your postings on diagrams,etc. but rest assured I look over and try to sight solve every problem you post. Also much enjoyed is discussions on lines of play and enjoyed seeing Jonothon's remarks. You are the #1 rated player in the World today and an average player as myself can learn much from you :-) Please continue to post and all of us can continue to learn.

Sincerely:
Alan Millhone, President
American Checker Federation
District 6 Champion
Alan Millhone
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Re: In Denial

Postby Alex_Moiseyev on Sun Dec 11, 2005 12:52 am

Lindus Edwards wrote:I will study these games carefully as I wish to improve in playing strength.


Lindus, nothing much to learn and improve from these games for player at your calibre. Today these games more likely are worthy only for historians and collectors :lol: Remember, at the time when we played these games - it was my first tournament ever in draughts. I didn't know anything about publish play, strategy or ending knoweledges. 99% of my efforts were in calculations. In addition - my opponent, Don DeWeber, also wasn't at the level to punish me for my mistakes. But I have couple more games with good players from this tournament - Don Brattin and Ed Bruch, who scored wins on me, and I will post these games soon (probably in other session).

In first game I played it perfectly right ... by "Russian / Brazilian checkers" ! :roll: :lol: Due to the game rule which allows you to jump back in trades, such moves as 6-9 and later 8-11 etc are sounds in other game ... not in draughts.

In second game we've got "mosaic" type of position - when pieces from both sides are going over each other. There is no such formation in Russian checkers at all, and my calculations failed :roll:. Any good checker player from each side in this game should consider move 12-16 and include it in calculations.

Lindus Edwards wrote:Perhaps reds only hope then would be to exchange 7-10 but with such positions the usual endgame loss is looming.


Before posting games on this site, I ran them quickly through Nemesis (8 pieces database). Program started "shaking" after 32-27 with following trade 7-10. In terms of practical chances against any human, I would consider this ending as winning. Many strategic factors and positional elements are involved here, which force me to comeup with such verdict.

Regards,

Alex
I am playing checkers, not chess.
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