Christmas Quiz 2013

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Christmas Quiz 2013

Postby liam stephens on Sun Dec 15, 2013 6:30 pm

See below. I will show the answers on here in the new year.

Wishing everyone a Happy Christmas and good hunting !

CHRISTMAS QUIZ 2013


1. Who referred to Gonotsky and Lieber as “the immortal bores” ?

2. Who coined the phrase:
“Till our own age Draughts was Wyllie, and Wyllie was Draughts.”

3. Which player was popularly referred to as the “Border Champion” ?

4. Who composed a Brooklyn stroke problem where the winning side starts a piece down ?

5. Which well known player, as a nine year old, beat Skinny Dalton in a game on Thunder Mountain ?

6. Who wrote the following:
“ If the penalty of being civilized is that we must connive and contrive to kill the most precious thing
we have – time – what surer or gentler instrument can we find than the game of Checkers ?”

7. In which guide does the following quotation, in relation to draughts, appear:

"Played well, we know of no other pastime so
replete with hidden wonders, or possessing so boundless
and increasing a fascination for those who acquire
a liking for it, as the noble and ancient one of
which we are writing.”

8. Who wrote the following ?
“Illegitimate and wild-cat proposals for increasing the scope of play, such as 11-man or 13 man checkers, are theoretical only and when put to the test produce unbalanced ' formational monstrosities' which can be proved unsound in eight
out of every ten starts.”

9. What name was first given to the opening formed by the moves 10-14, 22-18, 11-15, in 1869 ?


10. Identify the, nineteenth century, English player being described below:

In his teens [he] became attracted to draughts, and gravitated to its great school. Soon showing exceptional talent, he followed the then customary development. Crossboard skill as displayed in matches was all-in-all. Every district, every saloon had its champion, and members of its circle went scouting around to make a match on its behalf. [He] was soon a cut above this and fought his battles with abler men.
One who knew him expressed some astonishment that one so rough and unintellectual in appearance could perform his known feats, but I prefer to say that he was an outstanding example of how far real mental force can carry a man in a pure intellectual activity. He was a noticeable figure. Upon a body somewhat incommensurate, appeared the face of a fist-battered pugilist, surmounted by a shock of standup hair. His very assertive disposition was accompanied by some acuteness of mind. His quickness at making a point probably developed in that business training which went far to cause his early demise of bronchitis. But whatever his roughness or defects, charity reminds us that for over a decade he had no superior as a propagandist, touring the country in play, and attracting the public with his displays. For the rest, one adds that his famous position will keep his memory green.
liam stephens
 
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Re: Christmas Quiz 2013

Postby liam stephens on Wed Jan 01, 2014 5:23 am

Here are the answers:
Hands up, those who got all 10 correct answers.

Happy New Year to everyone.

CHRISTMAS QUIZ 2013


1. Who referred to Gonotsky and Lieber as “the immortal bores”.

Derek Oldbury on page 15 of the Hellman v Oldbury match book.
See also the Square World, Sept-Oct 1966, page 177, for a further comment.

2. Who coined the phrase:
“Till our own age Draughts was Wyllie and Wyllie was Draughts.”

John Alexander in Kear’s Encyclopaedia.

3. Which player was popularly referred to as the “Border Champion” ?

J. C. Brown (Ref: The Literature of Checkers – Call)

4. Who composed a Brooklyn stroke problem where the winning side starts a piece down ?

George Slocum - No 46 in Bill Salot’s compilation.

5. Which well known player, as a nine year old, beat Skinny Dalton in a game on Thunder Mountain ?

William Ryan – see The American Checkerist, Issue No 10, Jan 1945/ Feb 1946, page281 – The Battle on Thunder Mountain.
Willie commented as follow:
I introduced this sleeper attack (my speciality) in a private match with a Tennessee hillbilly when I was a bashful boy of nine years. My dear old Grandfather took me on a trip to Dixie on some quiet business. He had a terrible thirst for a particular brand of Smoky Mountain moonshine (as he called it), so one day we hit the dusty trail and wandered up into the mountainous wilds of Eastern Tennessee, in quest of some hillbilly hootch. We finally made contact with a tall, gaunt, mountaineer, sporting a blowsy punctured 1907 Stetson hat, and carrying an extra long-barrelled shotgun, just like in the pictures. After Grandpappy had stocked up his favourite firewater, in a little black suitcase, he introduced me to the lanky moonshiner as a wizard at checkers. Much to our surprise, the gawky Tennessean drawled, “Ah reck’in we awl kin give yoah boy some tawl competishin up in these parts suh.” Whereupon, he escorted us to a broken down shack a hundred yards or so down the gully, humble abode of one Skinny Dalton - bearded intellectual of the bootlegger’s stronghold. He looked like a fugitive from a barber shop. After a volley of vocal pleasantries, Skinny brought forth a dilapidated checkerboard that looked like it had gone through every campaign in the Civil War, and the pieces (bottle caps) were set for play. In the very first game we reached the position at B, and not knowing the book move, I moved 17-13. Salty Dalton stroked his wiry beard for a spell and then muttered, “Yer a tuff little critter, sonny. Ah’d swear I ain’t never seen that one befoah.” The play which follows here shows how I trapped Deadshot Dalton on Thunder Mountain.
[At the conclusion of the game] Skinny scowled, tipped the board over, and exclaimed, “Man! That’s the durndest tie-up ah ever did see. Ah quits righ heah, suh!” Grandfather, of course, was highly pleased with my performance. Later, on the train back to New York, he set me on his lap and said, “You did yourself proud son. I’ll always remember that game you won from Skinny Dalton on the Tennessee Tickler.” Wot a memoir!

6. Who wrote the following:
If the penalty of being civilized is that we must connive and contrive to kill the most precious thing we have – time – what surer or gentler instrument can we find than the game of Checkers ?

William Timothy Call in the Preface of his book R. D. Yates Checker Player.


7. In which guide does the following quotation, in relation to draughts, appear:

"Played well, we know of no other pastime so
replete with hidden wonders, or possessing so boundless
and increasing a fascination for those who acquire
a liking for it, as the noble and ancient one of
which we are writing.”

Belasco’s Elementary Guide to the Scientific Game of Draughts, London, 1888.
(Ref: The Literature of Checkers – Call)

8. Who wrote the following ?
“Illegitimate and wild-cat proposals for increasing the scope of play, such as 11-man or 13 man checkers, are theoretical only and when put to the test produce unbalanced “ formational monstrosities” which can be proved unsound in eight out of every ten starts.”
William Ryan in The American Checkerist, Issue No 10, Jan 1945/Feb 1946, page 285.

9 . What name was first given to the opening formed by the moves 10-14, 22-18, 11-15, in 1869 ?

The Dee (Ref: Tonar’s Draught Board May 1869.)



10. Identify the, nineteenth century, English player being described below:
In his teens [he] became attracted to draughts, and gravitated to its great school. Soon showing exceptional talent, he followed the then customary development. Crossboard skill as displayed in matches was all-in-all. Every district, every saloon had its champion, and members of its circle went scouting around to make a match on its behalf. [He] was soon a cut above this and fought his battles with abler men.
One who knew him expressed some astonishment that one so rough and unintellectual in appearance could perform his known feats, but I prefer to say that he was an outstanding example of how far real mental force can carry a man in a pure intellectual activity. He was a noticeable figure. Upon a body somewhat incommensurate, appeared the face of a fist-battered pugilist, surmounted by a shock of standup hair. His very assertive disposition was accompanied by some acuteness of mind. His quickness at making a point probably developed in that business training which went far to cause his early demise of bronchitis. But whatever his roughness or defects, charity reminds us that for over a decade he had no superior as a propagandist, touring the country in play, and attracting the public with his displays. For the rest, one adds that his famous position will keep his memory green.

William Strickland (Ref: J. Alexander in the ACM July-Aug 1928, and quoted in Oldbury’s Checker Chiaroscuro.)
liam stephens
 
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Re: Christmas Quiz 2013

Postby George Hay on Wed Jan 01, 2014 12:36 pm

Hello Liam, and Happy New Year 2014!

1. My educated guess as a reader of the ACF Forum was Derek Oldbury.
There is still a difference of opinion on this famous 2-move restriction 0-0-40 match draw!

3. J.C. Brown, the "Border Champion," I found in Vocabulary Of Checkers (VOC) by W.T. Call, page 23.

4. George Slocum's #46 The Lost Brooklyn was in Slocum Strokes by Bill Salot. I found it in the last place that I looked!

6. The W.T. Call quote was familiar as it was recently quoted in an article in ChicagoNow.
Checkers is a lesson on the game of life
http://www.chicagonow.com/trans-girl-cr ... game-life/
That narrowed it down to find in the preface of R.D. Yates Checker Player.

9. The Dee opening I found in VOC, page 49.

10. William Strickland of Strickland's Position I found on the Checkerchest website.
http://www.checkerschest.com/checkers/strickland.html
The picture of Strickland on the OMOCH Timeline for 1887 was a clue!
http://www.online-museum-of-checkers-hi ... index.html

I missed the other four questions. Go Willie!

--George Hay
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Re: Christmas Quiz 2013

Postby liam stephens on Wed Jan 01, 2014 1:33 pm

Hi George,

You did very well in the quiz.
Thanks for those supplementary references - all very interesting.

Those old stories and anecdotes by Willie Ryan are usually entertaining.
His article as "Temoc" in his MEC is a howler.

Here is a question for 2014 that may keep readers busy all year.

Name the player who took a game off Derek Oldbury in the 1982 Irish Open Championship at Kingscourt.

The answer will not, I think, be found in any of the books, but some of the players who were there and have long memories might be able to recall who it was.
(Were you there MO-RI-AR-I-TY? :D
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g_nh4wKKlhE )

Regards - Liam.
liam stephens
 
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Re: Christmas Quiz 2013

Postby liam stephens on Fri Jan 03, 2014 7:01 pm

Irish Open 1982
ACF Forum member Bernard Coll was there and emailed me the correct answer.
Congratulations Bernard and well done !

Incidentally, Joe Schwartz and Charles Walker were also there and may know the answer.
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