Endgame Problems

Discussion and analysis about certain positions.

Endgame Problems

Postby Lisle Cormier on Tue Apr 28, 2009 10:53 am

Last edited by Lisle Cormier on Fri May 29, 2009 5:20 pm, edited 6 times in total.
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Single Corner Forced Exchange

Postby Lisle Cormier on Wed Apr 29, 2009 7:30 am

From Boland's Familiar Themes, this problem uses control of the single corner to force a winning exchange.

Image

White to Win.


Answer:
15-10*, 13-17, 11-15*, 17-22, 15-18*, 22-25, 18-14*, 25-29, 14-9*, 29-25, 30-26*, 25-30, 26-22*, 21-25, 9-13*, 25-29, 13-9*, 30-25, 9-5, 25-18, 10-6*. White Wins.
Last edited by Lisle Cormier on Fri May 08, 2009 5:30 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Double Breeches

Postby Lisle Cormier on Thu Apr 30, 2009 10:19 am

The double breeches standard from Familiar Themes.

Image

White to Win.


Answer:
19-16*, 30-26, 29-25*, 4-8, 25-21*, 26-22, 21-17*, 22-26, 16-12*, 8-11, 12-8*, 11-16, 8-11*, 16-20, 11-15*, 26-23, 17-21*, 20-24, 14-9*, 5-14, 15-18*. White Wins.
Last edited by Lisle Cormier on Fri May 08, 2009 11:03 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Triangle Cramp

Postby Lisle Cormier on Tue May 05, 2009 9:12 am

Here is another Familiar Theme in a hidden setting.

Image

Black Plays, White Draws.

Answer:
15-18, 23-19*, 6-9, 26-23!*, 18-27, 30-26*, 27-31, 26-23*, 17-22, 25-18, 31-27, 19-16*, 27-24, 16-12*, 24-20, 12-8*, 20-16, 23-19!*, 16-23, 8-3*. Drawn.
Last edited by Lisle Cormier on Fri May 08, 2009 2:26 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Single Corner Cramp

Postby Lisle Cormier on Wed May 06, 2009 5:36 am

This problem combines two themes - the Single Corner Cramp and the Fugitive King. It is easier to solve from a macro view than move-by-move. Hold the four checkers cramped in the single corner, then attack the king without allowing the cramp to unwind. Since it only requires two checkers to hold the cramp, White can use a waiting move when necessary to gain tempo on the king.

Image

White to Win.


Answer:
10-7* (A), 28-24, 14-18, 24-19, 17-22, 19-15, 18-23, 15-19, 22-26, 19-24, 26-30! (B), 24-28, 7-10 (C), 28-24, 10-14, 24-28, 14-18, 28-24, 18-22, 24-28, 22-26, 28-24, 26-31, 24-28, 31-27, 28-24 (D), 27-32, 24-27, 23-18, 27-24 (E), 32-28*, 24-27 (F), 28-24,
27-31, 30-25, 31-26, 25-21, 26-31, 21-17 (G), 31-26, 17-14, 26-31, 14-10, 31-26, 10-7, 26-31, 18-22. White Wins.

A. White holds the single corner cramp with pieces on 20 and 7.

B. White restricts the Black king to squares 24, 28, and 32.

C. The piece on 7 is no longer needed to hold the single corner cramp, which is now maintained by Black pieces on 20 and 23. Thus it can be employed to attack the fugitive king. In addition, changing the guard to 23 from 7 allows the piece on 23 to serve the double function of holding the cramp and containing the king.

D. 28-32, 30-25, 16-19, 23-7, 32-23, 7-10. White Wins.

E. 27-31, 18-15, 11-18, 20-4, 18-23, 4-8. White Wins.

F. 16-19, 18-23, 19-26, 30-23. White Wins.

G. Not 18-23?, 16-19*, 23-7, 8-11*, 7-16, 12-28. Drawn.
Last edited by Lisle Cormier on Fri May 08, 2009 11:01 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Man-Down Double Corner Cramp

Postby Lisle Cormier on Thu May 07, 2009 7:58 am

Jim Loy's problem book has a beautiful correction of Problem 97 in Gould's Problem Book. Jim, you found a gem.

Image

White Plays, Black Draws.


Answer:
21-17, 23-26*, 11-15, 26-23*, 15-10, 23-26*, 10-6, 3-8*, 6-1, 8-11*, 22-18, 11-8!* (A), 17-13, 26-22*, 18-14, 22-17*, 14-10, 8-11*, 10-6, 17-14*, 6-2, 14-10*. Drawn.

A. Quiet and deadly! Otherwise, 26-22?, 18-14*, 22-13, 14-9*. Black Wins.
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Bridge Position

Postby Lisle Cormier on Fri May 08, 2009 5:26 pm

A nice problem from Boland's Bridges.

Image

White to Draw.


Answer:
7-2*, 19-15 (A), 9-5!* (B), 18-9, 10-6*, 1-10, 5-1*, 9-13 (C), 1-6*, 13-17, 2-7*, 17-14, 7-2*. Drawn.

A. 19-23, 2-6* (a), 23-26, 6-2*, 26-22, 2-6*, 22-17, 10-7!* (b), 1-10, 7-2*, 10-15, 2-7*. Drawn.

(a) 2-7?, 18-15*, 9-6, 23-18*, 14-9, 18-14*, 9-5, 14-9*, 6-2, 15-6, 7-11, 6-10*, 2-7, 10-14, 7-2, 14-18, 11-16, 18-15, 16-20, 9-14, 20-16, 14-18, 16-20, 18-23, 20-24, 23-19. Black Wins.

(b) 6-2?, 17-13*, 2-6, 1-5!*, 12-8, 3-12, 10-7, 13-17*. Black Wins.


B. 2-6?, 1-5*, 12-8, 3-12, 10-7, 15-19, 7-2, 12-16*, 2-7, 16-20*, 6-10, 20-24, 10-6, 24-27, 7-2, 27-31, 2-7, 31-26, 7-2, 26-22, 6-1, 19-15, 2-6, 22-17, 14-10, 5-14, 1-5, 17-21. Black Wins.

C. 9-5, 1-6*, 5-1, 2-7*, 10-14, 6-9*. Drawn.
Last edited by Lisle Cormier on Mon May 18, 2009 7:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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The Pocket

Postby Lisle Cormier on Fri May 08, 2009 6:20 pm

These companion problems from Wiswell's Checker Magic highlight a theme called The Pocket.

A Study in White
Image

White to Win.


Answer:
30-25*, 14-18, 21-17*, 18-23, 25-22* (A), 9-13, 17-14*, 23-26 (B), 22-17!*, 13-22, 19-15*. White Wins.

A. 17-13? forms The Pocket.

B. Or 23-27.



The Pocket
Image

Black Draws.


9-14*, 13-9, 14-17*, 25-21, 17-22* (A), 9-6, 22-26*, 6-2, 26-31*, 2-7, 31-27*, 7-16, 27-24*, 19-15, 24-19*. Black Draws by The Pocket.

A. Not 23-27?, 21-14, 27-31, 9-6*, 31-27, 6-10!*, 27-23, 19-15!*, 11-18, 10-15*, 18-22, 15-18*. White Wins by The Pocket.
Last edited by Lisle Cormier on Mon May 18, 2009 11:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Endgame Problems

Postby william on Sat May 09, 2009 9:09 am

Thank you lisle

for those interesting and fascinating problems . I am just surprised that there has been no contributions but your own here , as the idea of starting an " interseting endgame " article , is a good one . KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK , and if I get a bit of time to myself then i will try and post few

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Re: Endgame Problems

Postby Lisle Cormier on Fri May 15, 2009 12:20 pm

william wrote:Thank you lisle

for those interesting and fascinating problems . I am just surprised that there has been no contributions but your own here , as the idea of starting an " interseting endgame " article , is a good one . KEEP UP THE GREAT WORK , and if I get a bit of time to myself then i will try and post few

WILLIAM


Thanks, William. I am glad you are enjoying them.
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Self Incrimination

Postby Lisle Cormier on Tue May 19, 2009 11:06 am

I call this theme Self Incrimination because Black, in three instances, is punished by a two-for-one shot if he exposes a White piece to capture. The first two times, Black can avoid threatening the White piece. But the third time, Black must allow the drawing shot. Another classic from Wiswell's Checker Magic called Imagination.

Imagination
Image

White to Draw.


Answer:
16-11*, 18-22, 26-17, 13-22, 9-6*, 1-10, 11-7!*, 3-8 (A), 7-3*, 8-12, 3-7*, 10-15 (B), 30-25!*, 15-18 (C), 7-10*, 22-26, 10-14*. Drawn.

A. Black avoids the self incrimination that would result from moving the piece on 10 and allowing the shot by 30-25*.

B. 10-14, 7-10*, 14-18, 30-25*. Drawn.

C. Otherwise, there is self incrimination by 22-26, 7-11*. Drawn.
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The King Shot

Postby Lisle Cormier on Fri May 22, 2009 11:09 am

The King Shot is a well known and useful theme. These two problems from Wiswell's Checker Magic illustrate less obvious variations on the shot.

Brooklynite
Image

White to Draw.


Answer:
30-26!*, 9-13, 26-23!*, 14-17, 22-18*, 6-9, 11-15!*, 17-22 (A), 15-10!*, 22-26, 23-19!* (B), 26-31 (C), 10-15!!* (D). Drawn.

A. 17-21, 23-19*. Drawn.

B. 10-14?, 26-31, 14-5, 31-26*. White Wins.

C. 26-30, 10-15*. Drawn.

D. A triple threat King Shot.


The Stumbling Block
Image

White to Win.


Answer:
30-25* (A), 2-6, 10-7*, 6-10, 25-21, 10-15, 7-2, 15-19, 2-7*, 19-23, 7-10*, 23-26 (B), 22-18*, 26-30, 18-15*, 30-25, 15-11*, 25-22, 10-15*, 1-5, 11-7, 5-9, 21-17!*. White Wins.

A. 22-18?, 13-17*, 18-15, 2-6!*, 10-7, 6-10*, 15-6, 1-10, 7-2, 17-22, 2-6, 10-14*, 6-10, 14-17*. Drawn.

B. 1-5, 10-14*, 23-26, 22-18*, 26-30, 18-15*, 30-25, 14-18*. White Wins.
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Single Corner Block

Postby Lisle Cormier on Thu May 28, 2009 9:20 am

Here is the old "stuff 'em in a corner" routine.

Quicksand
Image

White to Win.


Answer:
20-16*, 12-19, 27-23*, 19-26, 17-14*, 10-17, 29-25!*. White Wins.


Image

White to Win.


Answer:
6-10*,14-18, 10-15*, 18-22, 13-17*, 22-25, 15-19!*, 16-23, 31-26!*, 23-30, 17-21!*. White Wins.
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Bridge Problem #2

Postby Lisle Cormier on Fri May 29, 2009 3:00 pm

This position from Boland's Bridges caught my attention because of its practicality. Black has sacrificed a man in order to break through for a king while maintaining a strong defense with his remaining forces. The caption "White to Win" should bring hope since many of us have faced an uphill battle when caught between a fortress and a marauding king. In this instance, at least, the aggravator is punished for this cheeky behavior.

There are three strategic possibilities for White:
(1) Allow the man on square 18 to crown and attack White's pieces from behind. The tradeoff must be that White gains a move that breaks through Black's fortress without losing material.
(2) Move the piece on square 17 in the hope of having more waiting moves than Black.
(3) Move the piece on square 17 with the intent of sacrificing a man through square 6 in order to crown and attack Black from behind.

White's first move is an important point that should clarify how to both defend and attack this type of fortress.

Image

White to Win.
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