Unofficial WCC Problem Composing Contest #11

Discussion and analysis about certain positions.

Unofficial WCC Problem Composing Contest #11

Postby Bill Salot on Sun Jun 30, 2013 8:10 am

RESULTS OF CONTEST 11: FIREWORKS! June 1 through June 29, 2013. For the fifth time in eleven unpredictable contests, there was a first place tie.

The leading composers, with their magic touches, are winning again and again.

Ed Atkinson, Harrisburg, PA, retained a piece of his unofficial world checker problem composing championship with his Caleb Oldenjumper (5 votes). He won Contest 10 outright.

Joining him at the top was Roy Little, Oklahoma City, OK, whose Mr. X also garnered 5 votes. This was the fourth time that Roy tied for first in these contests.

Both of the winning problems had slightly fewer pieces than their competition. Both gave Red a choice of two ways to get clobbered, resulting in two strokes for the price of one, whereas their competition did not.

In third place with 4 votes, barely one vote out of first place, was Pretty Polly by famed Stroke Specialist Melvyn Green, Salford, England.

So the top three problem titles were the names of people, either fictitious or real. Could that be the secret of impressing the judges?

Trailing miserably in last place, with zero votes, was Caught Stealing by Bill Salot, who blames it entirely on his poor title selection (humor).

Seriously, these contests are repeatedly showing that we have different perspectives on what constitutes a superior checker problem. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Capturing the eyes of beholders’ is the challenge facing composers. If you have the magic touch, you too can win.
Bill Salot
 
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Re: Unofficial WCC Problem Composing Contest #11

Postby George Hay on Mon Jul 01, 2013 7:45 am

Bill, all problems were very good! I could not play the trunk for Mr. X in CheckerBoard, but I could play variation A. For Mr. X I had to use Wincheck to play the trunk, and then in colors reversed to be interactive, and then it was trial and error to click on the correct squares to communicate the correct jumping sequence to the program! (Black goes first in Wincheck, even in problem settings, unless you are just viewing the moves without playing against the computer.) There is definintely an X factor in what problems win! I was very surpised that Caught Stealing received zero votes, as it is an entertaining and instructive problem!
During Problem Composing Contest #11, game 5 of the WCM in Italy produced and interesting deferred stroke ending. Would you clasify that as a Slokum Stroke?
--George Hay
George Hay
 
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Re: Unofficial WCC Problem Composing Contest #11

Postby Bill Salot on Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:19 pm

George,

It is not a Slocum Stroke unless the defender is forced into it. In other words, the stroke is deferred by one or more set-up moves.

If the defender could have avoided the stroke at his last move, but didn't and the stroke followed immediately, it is an immediate or undeferred stroke. sometimes called a pure stroke. Strictly speaking, a pure stroke has neither foreplay nor afterplay.

The special attraction of Slocum Strokes lies in the foreplay.
Bill Salot
 
Posts: 343
Joined: Sat Dec 15, 2007 10:57 am

Re: Unofficial WCC Problem Composing Contest #11

Postby George Hay on Tue Jul 02, 2013 5:47 pm

Bill, thank you for the clarification. The more I look at the ending,
the more it looks like Mr. Alex decided to go out in style in game 5!
--George Hay
George Hay
 
Posts: 814
Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 7:41 am
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan, USA


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