Online checkers library.

General Discussion about the game of Checkers.

Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Fri Oct 24, 2014 6:52 pm

On another subject - I hope you monitor the arrivals page in the library and noticed 400!!! issues of the "64 - Chess and Checkers Gazette". This gazette ran for 7 years and was closed on the first day of the WW II when Germany attacked USSR. Unfortunately the Gazette is in the DJVU format popular in Russia, it is like PDF but in many ways better with scanned pages. The DJVU driver is available on the main page, just click DejaVu Reader in the top left corner to install it (just once). This Reader installation package is located on the library site, it will not install any viruses.
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Fri Oct 24, 2014 8:19 pm

I moved both title pages to the INTRO page
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby Palomino on Tue Oct 28, 2014 7:06 pm

Jake, if you click on the below link you will be taken to a discussion of the "A" copy compared to the "B" copy of Payne's AN INTRODUCTION To the GAME of DRAUGHTS with scans of the title page from both versions.

posting.php?mode=edit&f=1&p=16214

At the time of this discussion I was in contact with my friend Al Darrow as we were comparing the differences in the copies of "A" compared to "B" and discovered that Al's copy, which was thought to be an "A" copy, was in fact different in one aspect of the title page from my scan of the "A" in that Al's copy has three "t"s in the address "Bedford Street" reading "Sttreet". This difference seemingly makes Al's copy a "C" copy. I would have to check back with Al as to when he purchased his copy but I believe he told me that he purchased it from Parlow. I then informed Don Deweber of this difference and he obtained scanned copies of the title pages from each of the four copies of Payne's book which he had gifted to Loras College if Dubuque. It turned out that Loras has one copy of "A", two copies of "B" and one copy of "C".

I have these scans in an e-mail from Loras but sadly do not have the knowledge or understanding as to how I can copy them to the form.

Here are the scans of the title pages of "A" and "B" from the above mentioned 2010 ACF forum post.

Image
CHECKERS: The Mind Sport of Kings and Ordinary Men.
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:40 pm

Palomino, I added your comments to the introduction
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby Alex_Moiseyev on Tue Oct 28, 2014 11:15 pm

Hey, I see one more difference !

After word "LONDON" left version of book ("A" edition) has ":", and right version ("B" edition) has ","

AM
I am playing checkers, not chess.
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Wed Oct 29, 2014 9:17 am

One of the most significant (and perhaps most mysterious) OCL contributors hails from Spain, his every letter filled with historical information, translations, references, etc., to me he is a true draughts historian.
I want to share a few excerpts from his today's letter:
I have realized today about the news of the uploads of true gems such as Payne's book of 1756... I searched it a lot months ago without success, as well as Pedro Ruiz Montero's book of 1591 (Spanish draughts) and other Spanish draughts books (mainly Cárceles Sabater's book of 1904; and Flaquer's book of 1909), without success again. A huge 'thank you' to the mysterious contributor. For example, I was not aware about the existance of Sturges' Critical Positions of 1808.

On the subject of Payne's book title pages he adds the following:
Regarding to Payne's different covers uploaded by Palomino at ACF forum, I want to note more writing differences apart from the ones noted by the own Palomino and Alex:

· A edition: 'YOUNG PLAYERS' and 'delightful AMUSEMENT,' (without comma and with comma, respectively).
· B edition: 'YOUNG PLAYERS,' and 'delightful AMUSEMENT.' (with comma and with point, respectively).

Below London, there are some differences with hyphens (present or not present) in italic fonts, as well as a ';' sign in B edition, at the end of the fifth line below London. Probably there are differences at the end of this paragraph with a final comma and a final point, the same than after the year MDCCLVI, but I can not enlarge the image, so I have my doubts.


On the subject of other books prior to Payne he adds:
You wrote 'The OCL library contains many Spanish books and one French book dated before 1756 and quite possible they describe the "English Draughts" one way or another' at ACF forum. I think you talk about Pierre Mallet's book of 1668 or "L'Aegis de Pallas" (dated 1727), which is about 8x8 checkers, probably a predecessor of English draughts
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby liam stephens on Wed Oct 29, 2014 11:26 am

Jake, The last book referred to may be
L'égide de Pallas, ou Théorie et pratique du jeu de dames
By Diego del Quercetano 1727.

========================================================================================

I have a manuscript in English that is a review of Pierre Mallet's 1668 book - see below.
The first paragraph is an extract from Dunne's Guide and Companion, but for the review of Mallet's book, which follows, I have been unable to trace who published it, though it appears to originate from Encyclopedie du Jeu De Dames 1855.
I published this article some years ago on the ACF Forum.



A CHALLENGE
Messieurs - If it can be permitted to one like me,
an honest Picardian, with some sort of civility and good feeling, and without being accused of sounding too loud my trumpet, to present a challenge to a dozen or more of those gentlemen whose swords flash from their scabbards at the name of Draughts: whether they be good christians or barbarians, I will meet them fearlessly and with a stout heart, and the greater the number the more willingly will I undertake the encounter. For, though it may be true in the game of Draughts, as in divers other things, they say that I am much more
fit for counsel than execution, nevertheless I will combat them singly, or in combined array, at the hazard of a dozen pistoles (about £5) to play according to the standard rules.
I chafe at the delay they make in presenting them¬selves, and await their coming with impatience, but with confidence.
PIERRE MALLET Mathematician to the King.

Copied from Dunne's Guide 1890.

..................................................................................................................................................................................................

MALLET (PIERRE) ENGINEER & TEACHER OF MATHEMATICS
The Game of Draughts (French style) with all the maxims and rules, both particular and general, which should be observed in this game, and the way to become a good player.
Paris, at the Palais, in the great room - 1668, 516 pages dedicated to the beautiful and highborn ladies.
Of these 516 pages scarcely half are concerned with the game of draughts, namely: 18 devoted to the title, dedication and contents (entitled: Brief and general description of the principal things included in the 18 chapters of this book), and the last nine chapters starting from the tenth page 201, apart from 36 pages of the twelfth chapter; everything else in the book has nothing to do with the game of Draughts.

But in this part of the book (dealing with Draughts) examples are given of the game itself, accurately divided into different categories - 'corporal' 'spiritual' and 'mixed' - the principles governing each of these categories are enumerated, together with definitions, descriptions, explanations, precepts, instructions, origins of draughts, arguments about the game and about chess; He also treats of the advantages to be gained or received, of the conditions, demonstrations, and advice on the game,
quotes certain great Players, tries a comparison between draughts and chess, gives general rules and maxims, different ways of playing to win, followed by several excellent openings for attack and defence. He deals with the best method of playing with the obligation to take not only when his opponent is strongest but also when the greatest gain can be achieved; He suggests a cartel of 12 of the world's greatest players, and concludes with a method of play whereby the single pieces or pawns cannot take the crowned pieces (kings); he explains the game of draughts known as Coq-Inbert and that called 'Jeu du Renard (game of the fox).
This book is really amazing in the clear logical way with which he sets forth all the above mentioned facts; it is especially interesting when we remember that it is the first book in French on the subject of Draughts; it is as precious as it is rare and sought after.
Mallet, its learned author has studied draughts deeply; He was very good at the game and was fully conversant with its spirit. In short, it is on this excellent treatise on the Game of Draughts as played in France that the majority of succeeding works have been modelled.
On pages 203-9, 215-16, 221-30, 270-78, 303-14 and 372, Mallet deals with chess in detail, which he recognises as a game of skill scientific and philosophic, a mathematical game owing nothing to chance; he teaches the way in which the chess-board must be laid out, the substances of which'it is usually made, quotes one surprising and very valuable example, made of white and yellow amber and gives his ideas on the invention and inventor of the game. He adds that Turks, Indians, Tartars (Russians), Greeks, Arabs and all Orientals play it as well as the Germans Spaniards and Italians; speaks of the work of Selenus, Duke of Brunswick, of the village of 'Echecs' (Volspergen) in the duchy of Brunswick, and of the way in which its inhabitants play chess; compares draughts to chess and after numerous arguments gives the palm to Draughts. He does not believe in the story of the Spaniards and Portuguese playing the game while travelling on horseback, nor in the monkey chess players quoted by several authorities, recalls Montaigne's opinions of Chess, and recognises that in all ages the greatest men and the most famous leaders have derived pleasure and recreation from Chess.


As very few people will be able to see this rare book, I think I should add the part not dealing with draughts,
is concerned with the development of a new and rather strange system of spelling in French; general definition of games, remarks on the necessity for games and amusements which are law abiding, subject to rules and governed by moderation, advice on how to avoid the lazy and workshy and how to work; rules and instructions for teaching the young, the enumeration of the 'Ludus' 'Jocus' and the 'Lusus' three kinds of games played by the Romans, to which can be traced all the various games or amusements created and practised by the ancients; mention is also made of a largo number of games practised in different times and places; historic details are given on the foundation of Carthage and Rome, on Palemon, Venus, Troy, Dido, the sacred fires and the Vestal Virgins; finally the story of Palamedes and details concerning Ipshigenia, Orestes,. Pylade and Clymonestre, things which it is surprising to find mixed up in a fine treatise on the Game of Draughts.
At the end of the book are two engravings representing the 64-square draught-board, of which 32 are numbered in a remarkable way. On each side consecutive numbers 1 to 16 are arranged in Boustrophedon i.e. written from right to left and from left to right in alternate lines, starting on the right of each player.



The first engraving shows the board divided into two halves with the squares alternately white and black, and the numbers on the white squares. The second engraving also shows the same division of the board into two halves; but the squares in this case are of one colour only, and on each side are twelve pawns (men) drawn as discs, some white with the top side at the bottom, others black with the bottom side at the top, bearing the consecutive 12 numbers drawn in Boustrophedon; the 8 squares between the two opposing sides bear no number.
The letters AB:DC are one in each of the four angles of the board, shaped as you see here.

Footnote
To what extent has Mallet influenced the Game of Draughts? He himself, (a military engineer by profession) acquired much of his ability for the Game by his natural aptitude for it, and by much practice with the then leading French and Spanish masters.
The review of his book, "The Game of Draughts" (and incidentally the first book in French on the game) is taken from Encyclopedie du Jeu De Dames 1855. It must have impressed William Payne a mathematician and author of "An Introduction to the Game of Draughts" the first book published in English on the Game of Draughts.


================================================================
Note: In the final sentence above (before the Footnote)
the letter A is turned upside down and the letter B is
a mirror image, in the original document. - L. S.
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Wed Oct 29, 2014 12:47 pm

Yes, the book is in the library, in the History and Bibliogarphy room http://checkersusa.com/books/History_Bi ... s_1668.pdf
Sorry about registration, the unprotected site is vulnerable to attacks. I do not ask anything, it is safe to register.
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Wed Oct 29, 2014 11:13 pm

This seems to be a very incomplete collection of the Board: http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=n ... up;seq=122
We need a volunteer to collect these pages, can anyone help?
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Thu Oct 30, 2014 9:14 am

Liam, I added your comments on Mallet in the library
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby liam stephens on Fri Oct 31, 2014 2:17 am

Thanks Jake, well done. Which heading is it under ?
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Fri Oct 31, 2014 7:11 pm

History and Bibliography, Mallet, Intro
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby liam stephens on Sat Nov 01, 2014 12:06 pm

I looked for the diagram mentioned at the end of the the review of the book, but could not find it.
It appears that some pages towards the end of the book may be missing.
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby tgf on Sat Nov 01, 2014 12:17 pm

liam stephens wrote:I looked for the diagram mentioned at the end of the the review of the book, but could not find it.
It appears that some pages towards the end of the book may be missing.

Which book are we talking about? I did not see any diagram on the Monnet book intro;
For Payne I did include the diagram/picture in the
"More discussion on the USA Checkers Forum."
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Re: Online checkers library.

Postby liam stephens on Sun Nov 02, 2014 4:16 am

I should have said "engravings".
Eureka - I've found them, just after page 60 in Mallet's book.
Like Ciurlionis' Sonata of the Pyramids they are quite amazing to behold !
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